Quadruple amputee beat the odds in cornhole

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KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) -- The best players in the world go head to head in the World Championships for Cornhole in Knoxville. An unlikely contestant from Maryland gave everyone else a run for their money.

"I just throw my game, just like anybody else would," said Dayton Webber, an 18-year-old young man competing in the Cornhole World Championships.

Webber walked through the doors and picked up a bean bag, proving one thing to the world.

"I can do it all," said Webber.

Just ten months after birth, a rare bacterial disease changed Webber's world. He had one choice -- a traumatic surgery where they had to amputate part of his arms and both legs.

He didn't let that stop him from growing up like everyone else.

"I write," said Webber. "My teachers always told me I had the best handwriting in the class. I'm actually really good at writing."

That also didn't stop him from playing the sport he loved, cornhole.

"I let my bags do the talking," said Webber.

Competitive in spirit, he will go head-to-head in the World Championships for Cornhole in Knoxville. He is confident he's got what it takes.

"I feel like I can put up a good fight against them," said Webber. "I played some of the best in the game and have beaten them."

It might be hard to believe, but he can do anything. He hunts, he drives, he even rides bikes.

"You can do anything with amputations," said Webber. "If you are amputated, that doesn't mean that you can't do anything. That's just a visual thing."

He credited his strength to his parents. Webber has always been positive. He kept his head up and believed in himself.

"I've never felt like I can't do something," said Webber. "I never felt down on myself at all. I just do it. I don't let anything hold me back."

Plus, all that cornhole playing took a little bit of practice and a whole lot of consistency.

"Against these guys you can't miss a bag," said Webber. "You miss a bag, you're giving up points."

For Webber, cornhole has been about so much more than the game. It represented family and overcoming a challenge some people never thought he could.

"Just don't give up," said Webber. "That's the main thing."