Newspaper: Versions of Libya attack conflict

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 file photo, a Libyan man investigates the inside of the U.S. Consulate after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, on the night of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012, in Benghazi, Libya.  Four members of Army special forces ready to head to Benghazi, Libya, after the deadly assault on the American diplomatic mission had ended were told not to go, according to a former top diplomat. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File)

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 file photo, a Libyan man investigates the inside of the U.S. Consulate after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, on the night of Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012, in Benghazi, Libya. Four members of Army special forces ready to head to Benghazi, Libya, after the deadly assault on the American diplomatic mission had ended were told not to go, according to a former top diplomat. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — A security officer hired to help protect the U.S. Special Mission in Libya gave conflicting versions of events during a terrorist attack there on Sept. 11, 2012, The New York Times has reported.

In an article published Thursday on its website, The Times said Dylan Davies, who worked for the Blue Mountain security business, gave the FBI a version of events in Benghazi that contradicts the account he provided in a recently published book and in an interview with "60 Minutes."

The newspaper said two senior government officials have described the information Davies gave the FBI as being consistent with an incident report by Blue Mountain, which had been hired to protect American interests in Benghazi. The report said Davies remained at his villa in Libya and did not get to the scene the night of the attack.

However, in his book "The Embassy House," which Davies wrote under a pseudonym, and in the version he gave to the CBS news show, Davies said he left his villa that night to visit a hospital, where he saw the body of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens, who was slain during the attack. He said he went to the scene twice and that at the compound he had a confrontation with an attacker.

Last week, Davies said in an interview with the online magazine The Daily Beast that he did not write the incident report and had never seen it, The Times said.

Jeff Fager, chairman of CBS News and executive producer of "60 Minutes," said Thursday, "we will make a correction," if the show has been "misled."

Associated Press
Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Join the Conversation!

To comment, the following rules must be followed:

  • No Obscenity, Profanity, Vulgarity, Racism or Violent Descriptions
  • No Negative Community Comparisons
  • No Fighting, Name-calling, or Personal Attacks
  • Multiple Accounts are Not Allowed
  • Stay on Story Topic

Comments may be monitored for inappropriate content, but the station is under no legal obligation to do so.
If you believe a comment violates the above rules, please use the Flagging Tool to alert a Moderator.
Flagging does not guarantee removal.

Multiple violations may result in account suspension.
Decisions to suspend or unsuspend accounts are made by Station Moderators.
Links require admin approval before posting.
Questions may be sent to webmaster@wvlt-tv.com. Please provide detailed information.

powered by Disqus

WVLT VOLUNTEER TV

6450 Papermill Drive Knoxville, TN 37919 Phone - (865) 450-8888; Fax - (865) 450-8869
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2014 WVLT-TV Inc. - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 231134201