Trayvon Martin's parents visit Knoxville, deliver message of hope

Tracy Martin, left, and Sybrina Fulton, parents of slain teen Trayvon Martin, speak to each other during a public town hall meeting with legal experts and political leaders on Thursday, April 19, 2012, in Tampa, Fla. George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, is charged with second-degree murder in Martin's shooting death in Sanford, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

Tracy Martin, left, and Sybrina Fulton, parents of slain teen Trayvon Martin, speak to each other during a public town hall meeting with legal experts and political leaders on Thursday, April 19, 2012, in Tampa, Fla. George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, is charged with second-degree murder in Martin's shooting death in Sanford, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

It has been a little more than a year since the death of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old shot and killed in Florida.

This weekend, his parents are in East Tennessee to spread their message against gun violence while hoping to prevent others from suffering the same fate as their son.

Community members gathered to take a stand and prevent any more young lives from being lost at Overcoming Believers Church Saturday night.

Trayvon's parents, Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, came to East Tennessee in hopes their son's story could save another life.

"We would just sit in our sorrow and consume ourselves with thinking of the death. Instead, we prefer to think about his life," said Fulton. "It's definitely in issue in all communities. We thought it was fit to come here and share."

Pastor Daryl Arnold often sees gun violence on the streets of Knoxville, and he hopes Trayvon's story helps curb the amount of deaths.

"I don't want to preach on Sundays and bury someone on Mondays," said Arnold. "I think the Martin family did not just represent the Martin family--I think they represent all of our families."

Speaking out not only helps others, however. Trayvon's parents have used it as a way to cope with the death of their son.

"We could be home and suffering from depression--rather than we do that, we decided we want to do something positive," said Fulton.


Join the Conversation!

To comment, the following rules must be followed:

  • No Obscenity, Profanity, Vulgarity, Racism or Violent Descriptions
  • No Negative Community Comparisons
  • No Fighting, Name-calling, or Personal Attacks
  • Multiple Accounts are Not Allowed
  • Stay on Story Topic

Comments may be monitored for inappropriate content, but the station is under no legal obligation to do so.
If you believe a comment violates the above rules, please use the Flagging Tool to alert a Moderator.
Flagging does not guarantee removal.

Multiple violations may result in account suspension.
Decisions to suspend or unsuspend accounts are made by Station Moderators.
Links require admin approval before posting.
Questions may be sent to webmaster@wvlt-tv.com. Please provide detailed information.

powered by Disqus

WVLT VOLUNTEER TV

6450 Papermill Drive Knoxville, TN 37919 Phone - (865) 450-8888; Fax - (865) 450-8869
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2014 WVLT-TV Inc. - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 196763341