Safety products for your children

Knoxville (WVLT) -- Many parents use safety products as a second line of defense, because children can get into trouble faster than you can blink.

But some of the very devices that are supposed to protect children can actually put them at risk.

We're covering East Tennessee health with a look at some of these products, and the solutions from experts.

In the most recent issue of Parents Magazine, experts investigate common safety products, in the homes of many families with young children, to expose potential dangers.

Here's what they found:

Those plastic outlet covers you use to prevent your child from getting electrocuted can pose a choking hazard.

Instead, get covers that screw into the wall and slide shut when outlets aren't in use.

Bath seats and rings that help your baby sit up in the bathtub, when left unattended for even a few seconds can lead to drowning.

Consider using a small plastic tub instead.

Wipe warmers.

They pose an electrocution and fire hazard.

Unnecessary risks your children can do without.

Crib bumpers can keep your baby from bumping their head.

But East Tennessee Children's Hospital emergency department Nurse Manager Christy Cooper says they are risky, "The problem with them is once the child becomes able to roll and turn over in bed is they can actually turn over and actually maybe suffocate between the pad and crib mattress."

It's best to just avoid them.

Seat belt positioners actually interfere with proper fit.

If your child is too short for a regular seat belt, Tennessee state law requires a booster seat.

Bed rails.

They prevent young children from falling out of bed, but can cause death if they get trapped between the bed rail and mattress.

Cooper says, "So, a better solution is using a toddler bed that's close to the floor that they're not going to roll out of, or using a bunk bed that already has the prefitted rails in there."

For years, doctors recommended Syrup of Ipecac to induce vomiting in case of poisoning.

Now, pediatricians advise against using it, because the latest research finds poisonous substances may cause more damage coming up than they did going down in the first place.

And baby rear view mirrors.

It's comforting to see you baby when he's in a rear facing car seat, but paramedics say like other loose objects in a car, they can become a dangerous projectile in a crash.

Look for a mirror that's lightweight, with cushioning or rounded edges.

Parenting experts say safety products are no replacement for adult supervision.

But they can serve as a safety net when used properly.

For more information on this and other parenting and family issues, click on the link below.


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