Food in your fridge may be unsafe to eat

By: Allison Kropff Email
By: Allison Kropff Email

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) - With tens of thousands of people still in the dark Wednesday, many will have to throw away refrigerators full of food.

Yes, it's a waste of money, but if you're not careful, you could end up paying more in doctors bills than it costs to restock your fridge.

On Wednesday, people all across the area have been without power for more than 20 hours. While they wait for the lights to come back on, they've been flooding the Knox County Health Department with questions about food safety.

"They're just wanting to be safe. They want to know how long food is still safe to consume," says Ronnie Nease, Director of Environmental Health. He says the best way to keep your food cold, is to keep the refrigerator doors closed.

"When the electricity comes back on, check the freezer to make sure everything is still frozen. If it is, you're in good shape. On the refrigerator, we need to be concerned about the perishable stuff like the milk, meat products and leftovers."

Nease says to check food with a probe thermometer to make sure it's safe to eat.

"If the temperature is above 41 degrees is what we consider the appropriate temperature, then you need to evaluate whether you throw it away and the saying is, when in doubt, throw it out."

If you decide to risk it, you could pay the price.

"With food borne outbreaks you're going to have diarreha, you'll have an upset stomach, chills it's just like having an intestinal disorder that you will have," says Nease.

And as crews work to get your power back on, the clock on your food is ticking.

"We're getting close to the time where I think everybody is going to need to throw their food out," says Nease.

Food borne outbreaks are especially dangerous for the elderly and the young.

If you want to save your food, make sure it's at 41 degrees or below and pack it on ice in a cooler.

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  • by k on Jun 22, 2011 at 08:11 PM
    Something is wrong with this picture. We are paying more now than ever for electricity and this is the worst power outage in KUBs history. And, we buy food when it's on sale and stock our freezers up because food prices are so high to only have to throw it away. It's truly a sad day when you have to toss good food out.
  • by Alvin Location: Ft. City on Jun 22, 2011 at 05:50 PM
    What people do in Florida when a massive power outage takes place is to have neighborhood cook outs to eat up as much of your food as you can. It is a way to meet your neighbors too. Dry ice and coolers can be used to salvage expensive meats.


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