High court rejects part of Arizona immigration law

But the court said Monday that one part of the law requiring police to check the status of someone they suspect is not in the United States legally could go forward.

Demonstrators stand outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Monday, June 25, 2012. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court struck down key provisions of Arizona's crackdown on immigrants Monday but said a much-debated portion on checking suspects' status could go forward.

The court did not throw out the state provision requiring police to check the immigration status of someone they suspect is not in the United States legally. Even there, though, the justices said the provision could be subject to additional legal challenges.

The decision upholds the "show me your papers" requirement for the moment. But it takes the teeth out of it by prohibiting police officers from arresting people on minor immigration charges.

The court announced that Thursday would be the last day of rulings this term, which means the decision on President Barack Obama's landmark health care overhaul probably will come that day.

Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote the opinion for the court that was unanimous on allowing the status check to go forward. The court was divided on striking down the other portions.

The court struck down these provisions: requiring all immigrants to obtain or carry immigration registration papers, making it a state criminal offense for an illegal immigrant to seek work or hold a job and allowing police to arrest suspected illegal immigrants without warrants.

The Obama administration sued to block the Arizona law soon after its enactment two years ago. Federal courts had refused to let the four key provisions take effect.

Five states — Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, South Carolina and Utah — have adopted variations on Arizona's law. Parts of those laws also are on hold pending the outcome of the Supreme Court case.

“The Supreme Court decision today underscores the need for the federal government to step up and enforce our nation’s laws. The very fact that Arizona saw the need for S.B. 1070 is the result of the Obama Administration’s failure to secure our border," said Rep. Chuck Fleischmann

"The State of Arizona has to live with the consequences of illegal immigration daily, so I am not surprised that they saw the need for this action," he continued. "It is my hope that the Obama Administration will finally step up and start enforcing federal immigration law.”

Associated Press
Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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