Lawson: Nashville was leader in nonviolent sit-ins

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) -- Civil rights leaders say Nashville's lunch counter sit-ins were instrumental in ensuring that student demonstrators across the south would embrace nonviolence.

Speaking at a forum on Thursday to honor the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., civil rights leader James Lawson said that after the success of the Montgomery bus boycott there was a real question as to whether nonviolence could work again.

Then in 1960, Lawson successfully led the Nashville sit-ins after a series of nonviolence workshops for black student leaders.

Later that year, students from across the south met for a conference to discuss how to move forward. At the time, Nashville was the only city that had desegregated its lunch counters, and it had done so nonviolently.

Nonviolence became a part of the movement's mission statement.


You must be logged in to post comments.

Username:
Password (case sensitive):
Remember Me:

WVLT VOLUNTEER TV

6450 Papermill Drive Knoxville, TN 37919 Phone - (865) 450-8888; Fax - (865) 450-8869
Copyright © 2015 WVLT-TV Inc. - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 187424361 - local8now.com/a?a=187424361
Gray Television, Inc.