Knitters cover Pittsburgh's Warhol Bridge in yarn

Volunteers worked all weekend to attach 580 blanket-size, hand-knitted panels to the pedestrian walkways on the downtown bridge, and riggers attached larger panels to the towers.

Pedestrians walk across the Andy Warhol bridge on Monday, Aug. 12, 2013 in downtown Pittsburgh. More that 1,800 knitters have covered the bridge in 3,000 feet of colorful yarn. Volunteers worked all weekend to attach 580 blanket-sized, hand- knitted panels to the pedestrian walkways. Organizers say it is the nation's largest yarn bomb. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

PITTSBURGH (AP) — More than 1,800 knitters have covered Pittsburgh's Andy Warhol Bridge in 3,000 feet of colorful yarn.

Volunteers worked all weekend to attach 580 blanket-size, hand-knitted panels to the pedestrian walkways on the downtown bridge, and riggers attached larger panels to the towers.

The planning and permitting started about 18 months ago, said Amanda Gross, 29, who had the idea for the project.

"The county doesn't have public arts policy. It was a big learning process for everybody," said Gross, who moved from Atlanta to Pittsburgh about five years ago and soon noticed how crucial bridges are in a city that has three major rivers running through it.

The project was organized by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh and other local institutions. Gross said knitters from more than 80 Pittsburgh neighborhoods and 120 area townships signed up to help with what the guild calls the nation's largest "yarn bomb." The term applies to artists who knit coverings for everyday objects like lampposts, street signs and trees.

Gross said yarn bombing is "really inspirational," and a good way to bring communities together.

Sherri Roberts, 60, a past president of the guild, said the project started as a "little nugget" of an idea and then "went to town from there."

The group ultimately had to work not just with designers but with lawyers, architects, structural engineers and riggers to make the yarn bomb a reality. Roberts said the group decided that the panels would contain only colors and designs — no words or political or religious symbols.

Gross said the group even wound up specifying acrylic yarn, since wool absorbs water, is flammable and can be a home to pests.

"Our structural engineer calculated the weight of the yarn, and also when it's wet," Gross said. "It was insignificant compared to traffic."

A community arts and crafts party will be held at the bridge on Aug. 25. The bridge will be covered in the yarn until Sept. 6.
Associated Press
Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Join the Conversation!

To comment, the following rules must be followed:

  • No Obscenity, Profanity, Vulgarity, Racism or Violent Descriptions
  • No Negative Community Comparisons
  • No Fighting, Name-calling, or Personal Attacks
  • Multiple Accounts are Not Allowed
  • Stay on Story Topic

Comments may be monitored for inappropriate content, but the station is under no legal obligation to do so.
If you believe a comment violates the above rules, please use the Flagging Tool to alert a Moderator.
Flagging does not guarantee removal.

Multiple violations may result in account suspension.
Decisions to suspend or unsuspend accounts are made by Station Moderators.
Links require admin approval before posting.
Questions may be sent to webmaster@wvlt-tv.com. Please provide detailed information.

powered by Disqus

WVLT VOLUNTEER TV

6450 Papermill Drive Knoxville, TN 37919 Phone - (865) 450-8888; Fax - (865) 450-8869
Copyright © 2014 WVLT-TV Inc. - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 219385291 - local8now.com/a?a=219385291
Gray Television, Inc.