Money in focus as UN climate talks enter last day

A dispute over money clouded U.N. climate talks Friday, as rich and poor countries sparred over funds meant to help the developing world cover the rising costs of mitigating global warming and adapting to it.

FILE - In this Sunday, Jan. 16, 2011 file photo, Beam Down Pilot project, a joint pilot project of the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Japan's Cosmo Oil Company and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, takes the conventional concentrated solar power design and literally turns it to on its head at Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Sunday Jan.16, 2011. The dean of a research institute at the core of Abu Dhabi's green-energy city said Sunday the government remains firmly committed to renewable power after recent shifts in the ambitious project's goals. Masdar City was originally conceived as a self-contained "carbon-neutral" community of 40,000 residents and even more commuters where cars would be banned and waste and water would be recycled.(AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili, File)

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — A dispute over money clouded U.N. climate talks Friday, as rich and poor countries sparred over funds meant to help the developing world cover the rising costs of mitigating global warming and adapting to it.

Developing countries want firm commitments from rich nations to scale up climate aid to poor countries to $100 billion annually by 2020, a general pledge that was made three years ago.

Rich nations are unwilling to commit to specific targets now, citing world financial turmoil and pressure on their budgets.

After overnight negotiations, a draft agreement was presented Friday that does not include midterm targets, which developing countries had called for. The U.N. climate secretariat said "further consultations are necessary."

That issue has overshadowed the talks since they started last week in Qatar, the first Middle Eastern country to host the slow-moving annual negotiations aimed at crafting a global response to climate change.

Climate activists said the talks were being held back by short-sighted financial concerns among developed countries.

"The tone of the negotiations is extremely sour now," said Greenpeace international leader Kumi Naidoo, who predicted that discussions would continue into the weekend.

Rich nations pledged in 2009 to deliver long-term financing to help poor nations switch to clean energy and adapt to rising sea levels and other impacts of global warming. They offered $10 billion a year in 2010-2012 in "fast-start" financing, pledging that the amount would be increased to $100 billion in 2020. But they didn't say how.

The latest text on the table urges developed countries "to make firm commitments to provide scaled up climate finance beyond 2012" but didn't include any midterm targets.

Negotiators were also trying to finalize an agreement to formally extend the Kyoto Protocol, an emissions reduction pact for rich countries that expires at the end of this year.

The U.S. never joined Kyoto while Japan, New Zealand, Canada and Russia don't want to be part of the extension, meaning it would only cover about 15 percent of the world's emissions of greenhouse gases.

Governments have set a deadline of 2015 to agree on a wider deal that would include both developed and developing countries, which now produce a majority of the world's emissions.

Associated Press
Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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