WATCH: Record-breaking BASE jump off Mt. Everest


KATHMANDU, Nepal (CBS) -- Sixty years on from the first ascent of Mount Everest, Russian Valery Rozov's added another first on the world's most famous mountain.

The 48-year-old has jumped off the north face of Mount Everest to record the world's highest ever base jump - 23687.7 feet above sea level.

Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay climbed Everest's 29,028.9 feet in 1953 and since then a number of others have reached the summit.

Rozov spent more than two years preparing for the Everest jump, including a considerable amount of time and effort devoted to developing a special new Wingsuit.

Rozov and his team, which included four sherpas as well as photographers and a camera crew, spent nearly three weeks in the Himalayas before the jump.

The ascent began on the Chinese side on the famous north route.

Rozov had selected an altitude of 23687.7 feet for his leap and it took four days to climb from the base camp to the jumping location.

Despite adverse weather conditions with temperatures 18 degrees below zero, Rozov made the jump.

Because the cliff at the top was not particularly high, the first moments of the leap in the high altitude air were the most critical. Rozov needed more time than usual in the thin air to transition from free fall to flying.

After that he flew for nearly a full minute at speeds of an estimated 124.274 miles an hour along the north face before he landed safely on the Rongbuk glacier - at an altitude of 19,521 feet

"Right behind me you can see the highest mountain in the world. I have just landed on the bottom of the north wall of Everest," Rozov said after completing the jump.

"It was one of the most difficult jumps for me because of the high altitude, my personal physical feeling not perfect of course. And I was a bit nervous about the vertical part at the beginning being a bit short for this altitude.

"But everything worked."

This is not the first time Rozov has made it into headlines for his spectacular leaps.

In 2009, he jumped into an active volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula while in 2010 he leapt from the Ulvetanna in the Antarctic.

Last year he jumped from the Shivling mountain in the Himalayas, an altitude of 21,063 feet, which served as the final test for the ultimate jump for the man with more than 10,000 to his name.


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